Bare roots arrived yesterday

This is Penstemon grandiflorus which allegedly likes sand so hopefully the very dry loose dirt rock garden will keep it happy.
Ta da!
I checked my other mystery legumes and these have three leaves instead of two. So I don’t know who they are.
A second one. There are also 2-3 like this in the backyard prairie. I’ll have to see if I have any candidates on the spreadsheet. Edit: no legumes there, so it must be a volunteer. Maybe the tiny wild bean vine of some sort I saw in backyard prairie last year?
When I finished planting the obedient plant roots in the backyard (and there were two in my package!!!) along with the plant sale native flowers, I watered everything. It was getting dark, so instead of plants here is cat friend Shackleton on his leash investigating the Missouri fluttermill primrose bud smells.
He loves his leash adventures.

Dixon Water Foundation morning

Bladderpod with small native bee
For someone who is probably growing this fellow’s relative, I sure have a hard time identifying cacti. I believe it’s Coryphantha sulcata based on having one central spine per areole. Here’s my baby.
Mom looks at photos she is taking.
Mom takes more photos.
It’s a magnificent creek!
Bubbles on moss.
Neat rocks the creek goes through.
A mournful thyris moth. We saw more in redbud flowers. I think it may have been getting water here, because if you zoom in you can see its proboscis out.
A cricket frog!
Another big view. You can see a redbud in the woods.
Englemann daisies growing above the creek! They’re much smaller than the ones in my garden. Presumably less water.
A white bush honeysuckle (a native one, Lonicera albiflora) branches over the creek.
This is probably a hawthorn shrub. Thanks to Abby for the suggestion that helped me look it up! There seem to be a lot of very similar species.
Here’s the probably-hawthorn trunk.
This seems familiar.
Ah ha!  A Missouri fluttermill primrose!  Note the red speckled and sort of square long flower bud.
An old seed pod at the base of the primrose plant. The leaves are much less red than the ones in my garden.
Ceanothus herbaceus, redroot or New Jersey tea.
Here are the leaves. I am growing its relative C. americanus (also called New Jersey tea) in my garden, from seeds bought from prairiemoon.com.
Blue flax!  It’s probably Linum pratense, which is an annual.  Apparently it does intergrade with the perennial Linum lewisii which is what I planted in my yard.
This flax hasn’t bloomed but you can see the leaves are very like the L. lewsii ones in my yard.
Another Englemann daisy demonstrates how adaptable this species is, growing up on the barrens away from the creek.
Just to the left, just below the middle of this picture is another fluttermill.
Cymopterus, a very early blooming wildflower, starts to go to seed.
I think this must be a much younger fluttermill Missouri primrose that has already bloomed.
This is prairie burnet.  I’d never noticed it before.  Thanks to Abby for the identification!
Yellow star grass (not actually a grass).
Another fluttermill primrose, this time in a big beautiful mound.
The face of abandonment.
Another dog who didn’t get to go.

The finished projects from yesterday plus seeds today

Four t posts. Wires go east to west on both, holding in the blackberry canes so we can walk through and harvest. There was one new sprout in the middle that grew up and we moved it into a line with another.
Close up so you can see aluminum wire.
We finished the compost pile area yesterday but I forgot to take a picture. Wes did a lovely job leveling it all and put rebar through several holes to keep it in place.
I connected an old hose from one of the rain barrels to make sure the pile stays suitably damp for decomposition.
See that big seedling on the lower right edge? I don’t recognize it, so there is a possibility it’s the native bush honeysuckle Lonicera albiflora which is what I planted in this pot and left out all winter.
A pale but bright turquoise fungus growing on the showy milkweed seeds. The seeds felt plump though so maybe some will grow.
Strophostyles helvula bean seeds. One has fungus but also a little root!!
All the seeds we planted out of fridge stratification today. There’s still a few more left for late April that needed more time.
A little mystery seedling in the old Maximilian sunflower area.
Paula and I pulled and dug a lot of Maximilian sunflower shoots out of there. Hopefully we can find them new homes!

Evening rounds

Back in the AC shelling purple hulled pink-eyed cowpea. The not quite dry ones maybe look a little pink on eyes??
They do have magnificently purple hulls.
These two cowpea pods are still working on getting that consistent purple.
I think this is the “fluttermill” seed pod beginning to develop on the Missouri fluttermill primrose.
Lacinato kale is getting a bit overshadowed by the Fordham giant Swiss chard. We’ll have to have a salad to help it out.
One marigold! Unfortunately it’s orange in the yellow section?? I thought the mix looked mostly yellow so hopefully at a distance we can pretend it’s golden. 🤣
Big banana spider on the north side of tomatoes.
A slightly smaller one on the south side.
Last night when I mowed the yard, I put the grass trimmings on the rainbow beds as a mulch. Hopefully that keeps the plants happier. You can see Judy’s yellow iris looking lovely in front.

Afternoon and evening

Argiope spider. We call them banana spiders for the yellow but I think most people call them garden spiders.
Missouri fluttermill primrose in the rock/sedum garden continues to bloom!
Many tomatoes along with kohlrabi.
A caterpillar on cilantro. Maybe a cutworm? It looks familiar…
Uzbek golden carrots! Excited to try them… I harvested a bit early on two. Oops.
Wes made hot pot style soup. It contains chard, kohlrabi stem and leaves, green beans, sweet peppers, onions, and green onions.
A view of the spread. We have a vaccinated guest!!

Primrose

Missouri fluttermill primrose in the rock/sedum garden is blooming though it’s closed for the hot afternoon.
I like the speckles.

Surprise primrose bloom!

Didn’t expect a bloom until next year. From seeds from Mom! Thanks Mom! Missouri fluttermill primrose. Narrow leaf is the primrose, adjacent broad leaves are strawberries.