07/31/2022 melon debut for this year

Paula wields the knife.
Oh no! Bad spot in our canteloupe!
The bad spot carefully removed leaves us with snack size halves. They were cold and delicious.
Saving seeds from this variety, Madhur Ras melon. I put it in the hot shade on the west facing front porch. It has a lot of melon goo on them that we couldn’t rinse off, so maybe they’ll be easier to clean after drying.

07/17/2022 straw bale sampling and other afternoon torture

We appear to have some potatoes in the straw bales.
The Granny Smith apple is having a hard time. The leaves are turning brittle and possibly sunscalded? We are on mandatory water conservation until the city pump is fixed Monday hopefully so the most I can do is hand water it. However, this apple tree is the most westward facing so maybe it’s just having problems.
Native Texas dandelion in backyard earlier.

07/17/2022 finally dealt with identifying dayflowers

The seeds are rugose. This means rough. Commelina erecta, the native species, has mostly smooth seeds. C. diffusa and C. communis have rugose seeds.
The “spathe” is the part that enfolds the flower. In C. communis the veins are slightly darker, which I believe matches this.
The tiny third petal in front is white. Apparently it’s blue in C. diffusa.

All this to say, after keying out with the NC TX flower, I am disappointed to find my yard full of dayflowers appears to be full of the invasive, non-native version.

Spreadsheet convenience

While I was organizing the blog, I decided to create a few standardized “filter views” for my plant spreadsheet. There’s the full inventory of everything (including things that haven’t sprouted or have failed), a view that shows just successful favorites, one that is ordered by planting date for edible plants only (ie mostly the vegetables), one for plants that I either have or can easily collect extras of (ie just waiting on them to go to seed or can do cuttings whenever), and finally one just for tomatoes. Just because.

06/25/2022 fluttermill harvest

I love the fluttermill primrose seed pods. Their four “paddles” split apart when pulled to reveal seeds inside in four channels.
Most pods had seeds. Some just had some shriveled little specks fall out which I assume were seeds that didn’t get fertilized.

06/17/2022

I had always assumed this plant, Dichondra, was introduced but apparently it’s not! The taxonomy is confusing but it’s at least probable that this is a native species.
That’s great because it was hard to get rid of haha.
Belly rub plz
Gram is so long but he still loves to sleep on this scratcher box.
Abby was right, this is Monarda fistulosa! It finally bloomed. I put these seeds out either in 2019 or 2020.
Rainbow garden continues to do mediocre on yellow and orange. But the others are fantastic!
I like that this plant hopper has a big spot on its underside.